Y is for Yes. Make it your default.

In doing so, you’ll be going against the crowd. P1010735The human tendency towards negativity bias, the psychological phenomenon by which we pay more attention to, and give more weight to, negative rather than positive experiences or information is well documented.

There are many ways to say No. This is too hard. What if? Isn’t the weather awful? I can’t. I won’t. How could you? How dare she? He’s a fool. She’s the enemy. I’m right. If only. That’s ridiculous.


Saying no takes more thought and more energy than saying yes. Yes is always easier because it accepts the flow of life — as it is, now. It leads to less thinking and more doing.

So be like Anne Frank, locked away in her secret annexe: ‘I don’t think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains’.

Like Molly Bloom, rolling around the bed of sexual assent:

Like Edward Guest’s man who tackled the thing that couldn’t be done and just did it.

Like Sapphire‘s Precious, cracking open constraints of class, gender, colour and education: “I’m gonna break through or somebody gonna break through to me – I’m gonna learn, catch up, be normal, change my seat to the front of the class.”

Like Anais Nin, giving up on what she called “the because”, realising that “in love there is no because, no reason, no explanation, no solutions” and that “we see others not as they are but as we are”.

Like Eyeore, on a rare good day:  “It’s snowing still,” said Eeyore gloomily.

“So it is.”

“And freezing.”

“Is it?”

“Yes,” said Eeyore.  “However,” he said, brightening up a little, “we haven’t had an earthquake lately.”

If Eyeore can do it…

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