Orna Ross Writer
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Literary Historical Fiction

I write literary historical fiction, family murder mysteries that span generations and uncover buried secrets of the past that are poisoning the present

Literary Fiction: Blue Mercy: A Family Murder Mystery

Literary Historical Fiction

When Mercy Mulcahy was 40 years old, she was accused of killing her elderly and tyrannical father.

Now, at the end of her life, she wants her daughter, Star, to know what really happened on that fateful night of Christmas Eve, 1989.

Star vehemently resists.

But why?

What is Mercy hiding?

Was her father’s death, as many believe, an assisted suicide?

Or something even more sinister?

Click on the book cover to read more about the book or make a purchase.
In paperback and hardback on Amazon

Literary Historical Fiction: The Irish Trilogy: A Family Murder Mystery

Each of these books can be read as a standalone. Taken together they cover four generations of a family from 1890 to 2010, set in Ireland, London and California.
Literary Historical Fiction

Literary Historical Fiction
Twenty years ago, Jo Devereux fled Mucknamore, the small Irish village where she grew up, driven away by buried secrets and hatreds.

Now she’s back to uncover the truth of what really happened between her family and their friends, the O’Donovans, during the bitter Irish Civil War of 1922.

When Jo meets Rory O’Donovan, the only man she ever truly loved, she is reminded of how the passion of rebellion sweeps people up. But her real interest now is in what happens after the rising.

Can the letters left by her estranged mother redeem the past and offer her–or maybe even both of them–a future?

Click on the book cover to read more about the book or make an ebook purchase.
In paperback and hardback on Amazon

Literary Historical Fiction: Her Secret Rose

The Yeats-Gonne Trilogy tells the story of the strange love triangle between the poet WB Yeats, his long-time muse Maud Gonne and her daughter, Iseult. Each of these books can be read as a standalone. Taken together they range across the years 1889 to 1923, set in Ireland, London and Paris.

Her Secret Rose: Willie and Maud

Willie Yeats is 23 years old in 1889, when dazzling Maud Gonne decides to recruit him in her newly adopted cause of Irish freedom–and “the troubling of his life” begins.

He spreads his dreams under her feet as they set about creating a new Ireland through poetry, politics and their shared interest in the occult. But this love affair is much more than poetic image would have you believe.

Packed with emotional twists and surprises, Her Secret Rose brings to life 1890s Dublin, London and Paris while exposing untold truths about one of history’s most charismatic love affairs. If you like Hamnet or Shadowplay then you’ll love this haunting and moving story.

Click on the book cover to read more about the book or make a purchase.

In paperback and hardback on Amazon

Literary Historical Fiction: Dancing in the Wind

It’s 1916, the world is at war, Ireland has just embarked on a doomed rebellion against the British, and WB Yeats, the famous Irish poet, has decided that “having come to 50 years”, he is in need of a wife. Just then comes the news that the love of his life, Maud Gonne, has been widowed and in the most spectacular way: her estranged husband John MacBride has been executed by the British government for his part in the 1916 Irish uprising.
Maud dispatches her 23-year-old daughter, Iseult, to ask the poet to help them get to Ireland, so they can be part of the independence revolution there. Iseult is as tall and beautiful as her mother was at that age, but with a more literary leaning, and her presence stirs the poet to painful memories and new, somewhat frightening, feelings.
As war escalates in Europe and revolution foments in Ireland, the public struggles for freedom and respect are played out in their intimate love triangle.
Click on the book cover to pre-order.

News About My Current Work in Progress

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9 hours ago
Orna Ross

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 93. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 93: Maud Gonne MacBride to John MacBride

John, I cannot see you tomorrow. I have been through so much my nerves are so overstrained I should only break down foolishly as I did today. I do not, I cannot, believe what you say. Mr O’Brien shall see Mr Witham and draw up the terms of separation, the draft of which they shall send me to Paris. I shall write to you to Dublin news of Seaghán. In order to let the house in Paris I shall have to get a procuration from you taking off your signature or authorising me to sign alone. The same applies to the property in Colleville.

What do you want me to do about your things in Paris – shall I get them packed and sent to you in Dublin or to Westport? If the house lets you would hardly care to have them there.

It is a sad New Year’s Eve for us both. The years have been sad ever since our marriage. I hope the future may be more peaceful for both.�
... See MoreSee Less

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 93. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 93: Maud Gonne MacBride to John MacBride

John, I cannot see you tomorrow. I have been through so much my nerves are so overstrained I should only break down foolishly as I did today. I do not, I cannot, believe what you say. Mr O’Brien shall see Mr Witham and draw up the terms of separation, the draft of which they shall send me to Paris. I shall write to you to Dublin news of Seaghán. In order to let the house in Paris I shall have to get a procuration from you taking off your signature or authorising me to sign alone. The same applies to the property in Colleville.

What do you want me to do about your things in Paris – shall I get them packed and sent to you in Dublin or to Westport? If the house lets you would hardly care to have them there.

It is a sad New Year’s Eve for us both. The years have been sad ever since our marriage. I hope the future may be more peaceful for both.�
1 day ago
Orna Ross

Read today’s #inspirationalpoem.

THERE IS HERE

For WB Yeats

Our hearts of old were hearts of flame
that from an ancient sunlight came,
through drops of mirroring joy that fell
into the moon’s pale silver shell.

(But here hearts cry that hearts are slaves,
and toss and turn in narrow caves.)

Sit where there is no pain nor death,
beneath our soft, bare-breathing breath,
for there is here, and here is there,
so long as moon reflects sun's glare.

(Sooth hearts that cry hearts are enslaved.
evoke the joy their cravings crave.)

Our task is to succumb, accept
the mystery of death and breath.
Know how pale moon reflects sun's glare:
that darkest night holds both with care.

(Then heart can feel how heart is saved
and fly free of its thought-hewn cave.)

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Get your #freebook of #inspirationalpoetry and find out about Orna’s #poetrymembers at: OrnaRoss.com/freepoetry

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Image reposted with thanks from @midnight_venture

▪️▪️
 
#poetrylovers
#poetryisnotdead
#poetryislife
#poetryislove
#wordpower
#amwritingpoetry
#indiepoetry
#irishpoetry
#inspirationalpoetry
#poetrybooks #irishpoetrylovers
#poet #irishpoet #irishpoetry
#poetrybooks #chapbooks
... See MoreSee Less

Read today’s #inspirationalpoem.

THERE IS HERE

For WB Yeats

Our hearts of old were hearts of flame
that from an ancient sunlight came,
through drops of mirroring joy that fell
into the moon’s pale silver shell.

(But here hearts cry that hearts are slaves,
and toss and turn in narrow caves.)

Sit where there is no pain nor death,
beneath our soft, bare-breathing breath,
for there is here, and here is there,
so long as moon reflects suns glare. 

(Sooth hearts that cry hearts are enslaved. 
evoke the joy their cravings crave.)

Our task is to succumb, accept
the mystery of death and breath. 
Know how pale moon reflects suns glare:
that darkest night holds both with care.

(Then heart can feel how heart is saved
and fly free of its thought-hewn cave.)

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Get your #freebook of #inspirationalpoetry and find out about Orna’s #poetrymembers at: OrnaRoss.com/freepoetry

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Image reposted with thanks from @midnight_venture

▪️▪️
 
#poetrylovers
#poetryisnotdead
#poetryislife
#poetryislove
#wordpower
#amwritingpoetry
#indiepoetry
#irishpoetry
#inspirationalpoetry
#poetrybooks #irishpoetrylovers
#poet #irishpoet #irishpoetry
#poetrybooks #chapbooks
1 day ago
Orna Ross

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 92. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 92: John MacBride to Maud Gonne MacBride

I asked if there was a letter for me this morning Maud but was told there was no delivery on Sunday. Did you write? It is very important that you and I should have a few minutes talk before you go to Paris and before I leave for Dublin. Send me word please, saying where we can meet. I am going to Anthony’s for lunch unless I receive word from you before 1 o’clock and I’ll probably remain there until about 3 o’c.

I’d like to impress on you that we owe it to our country and that it is only doing our duty towards little Seaghán to come to an understanding.

The O’Briens were full of praise for the merry-hearted boy yesterday. Please take him in your arms and whisper a New Year’s wish in his tiny ear for his father.

May I wish you a year of peace and happiness
... See MoreSee Less

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 92. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 92: John MacBride to Maud Gonne MacBride

I asked if there was a letter for me this morning Maud but was told there was no delivery on Sunday. Did you write? It is very important that you and I should have a few minutes talk before you go to Paris and before I leave for Dublin. Send me word please, saying where we can meet. I am going to Anthony’s for lunch unless I receive word from you before 1 o’clock and I’ll probably remain there until about 3 o’c.

I’d like to impress on you that we owe it to our country and that it is only doing our duty towards little Seaghán to come to an understanding.

The O’Briens were full of praise for the merry-hearted boy yesterday. Please take him in your arms and whisper a New Year’s wish in his tiny ear for his father.

May I wish you a year of peace and happiness
2 days ago
Orna Ross

Read today’s #inspirationalpoem below.

THERE IS HERE

For WB Yeats

Our hearts of old were hearts of flame
that from an ancient sunlight came,
through drops of mirroring joy that fell
into the moon’s pale silver shell.

But here hearts cry that hearts are slaves,
and toss and turn in narrow caves.

Sit where there is no pain nor death,
beneath our soft, bare-breathing breath,
for there is here, and here is there,
so long as moon reflects sun's glare.

Sooth hearts that cry they are enslaved.
Invite the lights their cravings crave.

The task is to succumb, accept
the mystery of death and breath.
Know that pale moon reflects sun's glare
because dark night holds all with care.

Then heart can feel how soul is saved
and fly free of its self-made cave.

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Get your #freebook of #inspirationalpoetry and find out about Orna’s #poetrymembers at: OrnaRoss.com/freepoetry

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Image reposted with thanks from @midnight_venture

▪️▪️
 
#poetrylovers
#poetryisnotdead
#poetryislife
#poetryislove
#wordpower
#amwritingpoetry
#indiepoetry
#irishpoetry
#inspirationalpoetry
#poetrybooks #irishpoetrylovers
#poet #irishpoet #irishpoetry
#poetrybooks #chapbooks
... See MoreSee Less

Read today’s #inspirationalpoem below.

THERE IS HERE

For WB Yeats

Our hearts of old were hearts of flame
that from an ancient sunlight came,
through drops of mirroring joy that fell
into the moon’s pale silver shell.

But here hearts cry that hearts are slaves,
and toss and turn in narrow caves. 

Sit where there is no pain nor death,
beneath our soft, bare-breathing breath,
for there is here, and here is there,
so long as moon reflects suns glare.

Sooth hearts that cry they are enslaved. 
Invite the lights their cravings crave.

The task is to succumb, accept
the mystery of death and breath. 
Know that pale moon reflects suns glare
because dark night holds all with care.

Then heart can feel how soul is saved
and fly free of its self-made cave.

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Get your #freebook of #inspirationalpoetry and find out about Orna’s #poetrymembers at: OrnaRoss.com/freepoetry

▪️ 🙏📖🌹❤️ ▪️

Image reposted with thanks from @midnight_venture

▪️▪️
 
#poetrylovers
#poetryisnotdead
#poetryislife
#poetryislove
#wordpower
#amwritingpoetry
#indiepoetry
#irishpoetry
#inspirationalpoetry
#poetrybooks #irishpoetrylovers
#poet #irishpoet #irishpoetry
#poetrybooks #chapbooks
2 days ago
Orna Ross

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 91. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 91: Maud Gonne MacBride to Barry O’Brien

My dear Mr O’Brien

I didn’t thank you this afternoon as I should for your kindness in permitting John to see Seaghán at your home and for receiving me there – but I was rather upset. My nerves have been terribly overstrained lately and seeing my husband for the first time since I heard these terrible things was very trying.

I would like to have believed all he said. I cannot do so.

My nerves gave way and I began to cry at the end of our interview during the few moments we were alone at the end and I fear this has given John hope that I can be weakened in my determination about separation. He at once begged to see me today which I refused and this morning he writes again asking me to see him – which again I have refused.

In the arrangement which you shall make with Mr Witham it is useless to ask me to agree to anything less than ten years control of the child. I have already conceded too much. If John keeps from drink and does not otherwise annoy me, I am not selfish and would gladly increase the opportunities for him to see the child but it must be left to my discretion. I must have safeguards.

You know Ireland and you know how terribly it shall injure me, this separation without explanation. It is always the woman who suffers in these cases. The whole scandal coming out would be far less bad for me than this shall be, which spares John, the guilty one. If he were wise or wished really to atone for the wrong he has done, he would accept your suggestion of getting a commission in the American army. Dublin is about the worst place he could be in from the drink point of view.

It has occurred to me he might think of following me to Paris with the hope of getting me to give up separation. The house being taken in both our names I could not legally refuse him admittance but I shall not see him any more. His presence in Paris would be very dangerous as any indiscretion on the part either of my friends or the servants who know that dreadful matter would get him arrested for a criminal offence. Then the affair is out of my hands. So if he says anything about going to Paris please advise him against it.

Please give my kind regards to Mrs O’Brien and thank her for her kind hospitality. I fear it must have been most troublesome to her and to you.
... See MoreSee Less

DANCING IN THE WIND NOTEBOOK DAY 91. (Click the blue sign-up button to receive story extracts by email, and help guide the writing of this book). DAY 91: Maud Gonne MacBride to Barry O’Brien

My dear Mr O’Brien

I didn’t thank you this afternoon as I should for your kindness in permitting John to see Seaghán at your home and for receiving me there – but I was rather upset. My nerves have been terribly overstrained lately and seeing my husband for the first time since I heard these terrible things was very trying.

I would like to have believed all he said. I cannot do so.

My nerves gave way and I began to cry at the end of our interview during the few moments we were alone at the end and I fear this has given John hope that I can be weakened in my determination about separation. He at once begged to see me today which I refused and this morning he writes again asking me to see him – which again I have refused.

In the arrangement which you shall make with Mr Witham it is useless to ask me to agree to anything less than ten years control of the child. I have already conceded too much. If John keeps from drink and does not otherwise annoy me, I am not selfish and would gladly increase the opportunities for him to see the child but it must be left to my discretion. I must have safeguards.

You know Ireland and you know how terribly it shall injure me, this separation without explanation. It is always the woman who suffers in these cases. The whole scandal coming out would be far less bad for me than this shall be, which spares John, the guilty one. If he were wise or wished really to atone for the wrong he has done, he would accept your suggestion of getting a commission in the American army. Dublin is about the worst place he could be in from the drink point of view.

It has occurred to me he might think of following me to Paris with the hope of getting me to give up separation. The house being taken in both our names I could not legally refuse him admittance but I shall not see him any more. His presence in Paris would be very dangerous as any indiscretion on the part either of my friends or the servants who know that dreadful matter would get him arrested for a criminal offence. Then the affair is out of my hands. So if he says anything about going to Paris please advise him against it.

Please give my kind regards to Mrs O’Brien and thank her for her kind hospitality. I fear it must have been most troublesome to her and to you.
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